Friday, September 2, 2011

Gold And Rubies

I have a habit of overbuying at the farmer's market. All that gorgeous produce seduces my money out of my pocket and I come home laden with more strawberries, or cantaloupes, or cherry tomatoes than we can eat in a week, even with house guests. Temptation is something I can rarely resist.

Luckily, there is a solution for the overabundance. Strawberries can be frozen or made into jam. Cantaloupes work as well as an appetizer with a little prosciutto as they do as a dessert, and I have even resorted to making cantaloupe granita, which is a wonderful way to use up extra melon.

And tomatoes of any stamp, even tiny cherries like these, can be roasted and stored in the fridge for quite a long time. I got my recipe from Molly Wizenberg and I've never found a reason to go looking elsewhere. It's simple and yields richly flavored, concentrated tomato goodness. It's like having money in the bank or, better yet, like having gold and rubies in your fridge. They can come out to pop a few as a snack, to decorate an otherwise plain burger, to toss into a salad or to add to other dishes where a rich tomato taste is welcome.

So, next time you are seduced at the market, you know what to do. Give in!

9 Comments:

Blogger cookiecrumb said...

Oh! That's nice. At first I was afraid they were aka sun-dried tomatoes (so '80s). These sound good. I wouldn't hesitate to store some in the freezer over the winter.

Friday, September 02, 2011  
Blogger Greg said...

So sweet like candy.

Friday, September 02, 2011  
Blogger namastenancy said...

Tomatoes are the one thing that goes into the mouth as soon as I get the bag home from the Farmer's Market. Actually, I have worked hard to not overbuy, having thrown many good vegetables into the compost heap. Now, I make vegetables a la grecque as soon as I realize that those gorgeous green beans, mushrooms, etc are going to be moldy mush before I'm hungry enough to eat them:
http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/vegetables-a-la-grecque
Speaking of mush - I've written to the Albers web site to see if I can find out more about Carnation Mush. I found a photo of boxes on e-bay which indicate that the mush could have been wheat or oats as well as corn.

Friday, September 02, 2011  
Blogger Zoomie said...

Cookiecrumb, good idea to freeze some - I will do that next time I come home with 'way too many cherries.

Greg, yes, amazing how the oven sweetens them up.

Nancy, I'll be interested to read what you discover about the mush. I remember hearing about "corn meal mush," but I'm sure I've never tasted it. I'm sure it's just a hot cereal (not my favorite kind of food) but it's funny that the word "mush" isn't used any more.

Saturday, September 03, 2011  
Blogger cookiecrumb said...

My mom used to say corn meal mush. It was simply cooked cornmeal (y'know, with water). Like yellow grits, or, gasp, polenta!

Saturday, September 03, 2011  
Blogger katiez said...

I froze lots of them, whole, in baggies, for use over the winter. We also keep a bowl on the counter for snacks - think popcorn, but healthier and heartier....

Saturday, September 03, 2011  
Blogger Zoomie said...

Cookiecrumb, do you remember eating corn meal mush? Was it good - sweet like corn and polenta? - or nasty?

Katiez, that's how we eat them, too. I keep a bowl of red and a bowl of gold on the kitchen counter for popping. So delicious!

Saturday, September 03, 2011  
Blogger cookiecrumb said...

Not nasty at all! I remember cooking cornmeal mush in college to use for tamale pie.
And if there are leftovers (the mush, not the pie), you spread it out in a flat dish, refrigerate, and the next day you fry up little slabs of it. Serve with butter and maple syrup.

Saturday, September 03, 2011  
Blogger Zoomie said...

Cookiecrumb, I think you are at the head of a revival of corn meal mush. When you feel like another food blog post, why not teach us about mush?

Sunday, September 04, 2011  

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